Tag Archives: panels

Yeoman Basics by example: A Ctools Content Type generator for Drupal

generator-ctools-content-type example

A few weeks ago I wrote a blog post about Yeoman and the existing Yeoman generators for Drupal. As someone who loves and rants a lot about code generation, it was a tool that I had been wanting to try out for quite some time, and the experience after having spent a couple of hours with the tool, figuring out which generators could be useful for me, was rather satisfactory.

Now, beyond having some generators that I can benefit from, my interest in Yeoman was mostly in the APIish side of it. In other words, I wanted to see how easy it is to create my own generators for whatever tasks I find myself repeating a lot. The best way to find that out is, of course, to try and write a generator plugin for it, facing the usual challenges of being a total newcomer to a language or a framework. One of the most common pieces of code I have to write in my projects, are ctools plugins, in particular, Content Type plugins, so I decided to write a generator for just those type of plugins. This post will explain the basics of the tool and how to create a basic generator. If you want to get the most out of it, I’d recommend you to open your IDE or text editor of choice, and follow along, so that you can experiment with Yeoman at the same time.

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Adding panels support to the Reply module

One of the major disadvantages of entities in Drupal 7, is the lack of support for built-in comments. This is due to the model of the core comments module, which is heavily tied to nodes -node comments are essentially settings of each content type-, and not available for other entity types. In Drupal 8 this has changed already, and comments are considered fields that can be attached to any entity type.

For Drupal 7, in the meantime, there’s been a similar solution for a while, which is the reply module. The reply module leverages the Entity API to define a “reply” entity type, and offers a UI to create “reply” bundles. Then, via the Field API, you can add a “Reply” field to any entity type, choosing the reply bundle that should be used by that particular field. The flexibility that gives is huge, since it means that you’re not restricted to just a comment type for your application. Continue reading