Tag Archives: Career

Some thoughts on my favourite quotes of “The Clean Coder”

Last week I finished Robert C.Martin’s The Clean Coder: A Code of Conduct for Professional Programmers. It had been on my shelf for a year and a half, and last year I even started it and got halfway through it, but ended up forgetting it for some time. Until last month, when I decided to start it again, but this time, going cover to cover.

Chances are that you’ve come across it before, at least once. If you haven’t, then I’m happy you’re reading this post now. If you have, but it didn’t arouse an interest in you, then let this post serve as a reminder to you, software developer, that it is probably one of the few must-read books that you need to read. You might not agree 100% with everything that is said in the book, although you’ll probably agree with a big chunk of it, and if you’re like me, you’ll realise about things that you never thought of before, and you’ll find some other aspects of your job where you can still improve. One way or the other, I can’t recommend it enough.

With most books (technical ones, at least), I like to do a quick recap of the things that I liked most, or that caught my eye for some reason. I won’t do a review of this book, but I wanted to list here some of the quotes that I found more interesting. Not because they looked very poetic but because of the principles and attitudes they show towards the software development profession. So, let’s get straight into it.

Excerpt from the preface. On political pressure and experts’ advice:

Despite all the protest and memos, and urgings of the engineers, the managers believed they knew better. They thought the engineers were overreacting. They didn’t trust the engineers’ data or their conclusions. They launched because they were under immense financial and political pressure. They hoped everything would be just fine.

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Summary of the first quarter of 2015

Motivated kid

2014 wasn’t a bad year. I could say it was a reasonably ok year for me in some aspects, althought I didn’t make, by any means, as much progress as I wanted in many of my side projects. To say that I got a bit stagnated would be in fact to say too much, though, because while I didn’t progress as much as wanted in some things, I did progress on other things not initially planned.

That raised for me an obvious thing (or two) to address as soon as possible: planning and focus. Planning, so that I have a clear path to follow in order to achieve what I want to achieve, and by the time I want to get it done. Focus, so that I can successfully push out of my plate anything that is not related to the things I want to do or the things I want to learn. Or, seeing it from a different perspective, so that I can avoid one of the endemic ills most software developers out there suffer: (not) finishing things.  While I don’t consider myself a non-finisher, I truly believe I can become a much better finisher. Continue reading

Back to writing thanks to a blogging course

Monkey using a typewriter

Not an actual representation of myself

Yes, the title is right, and no, I’m not embarassed of saying that I’m finally making use of this blog, and that it all has happened, in part, thanks to a free 3-week blogging course from John Sonmez that I recently signed up for.

So who’s that John Sonmez guy? Well, I came across his website a few months ago, when reading one of Derick Bailey’s newsletters in which John’s site (Simple Programmer) was linked, or mentioned in some way. The first thought that struck my mind was that the site was probably some kind of developer community, given the visual design and the topics of some of the posts, but I was totally wrong. It was “just” his personal blog, and I have to say a rather good one, because all the materials and professional advice one can find in there have an incredible value.

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