Category Archives: Drupal

Overwriting global permissions within Organic Groups for single page requests

Druplicon logo with avatar icons

In a recent project built in Drupal 7, I came across a bit of an uncommon scenario, by which some users needed to have access to certain features that were normally restricted to them, when viewing, editing or creating groups content (ie: whenever they are visiting a part of the site that is considered part of a group).

For example, while normal users didn’t have access to use certain text formats in the wysiwyg editor, those that were considered group leaders needed to make use of that particular text format. In this scenario, a group leader was an existing role within Organic Groups.

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Upgrading Drupal’s Viewport module to Drupal 8 (Part 3 – Final)

Drupal 7 to D8 migration

Image taken from https://drupalize.me

With parts one and two of the series covered, this 3rd (and final!) part will cover some other important aspects of Drupal development that I wanted to pay attention to while working on the Drupal 8 version of the viewport module.

Essentially, the kind of aspects that are easy to forget (or ignore on purpose) when a developer comes up with a working version or something “good enough” to be released, and thinks there’s no need to write tests for the existing codebase (we’ve all done it at some point).

This post will be a mix of links to documentation and resources that were either useful or new to me, and tips about some of the utilities and classes available when writing unit or functoinal tests.

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Upgrading Drupal’s Viewport module to Drupal 8 (Part 2)

Drupal 8 logo

In the last blog post, I started to talk about the process of upgrading the Viewport module from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8. While the module is now fully ported and has a stable version for Drupal 8, I didn’t cover all the steps and new things that I came across while working on it.

This time I’ll go through the notes I took while working on the settings page, the creation of a proper schema for configuration management, and the conversion of procedural code into PHP classes. Let’s get into it:

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Upgrading Drupal’s Viewport module to Drupal 8 (Part 1)

Drupal relay

Image taken from Phase2 website

Viewport is one of the modules I maintain for Drupal 7. It’s a very small and simple module that does a very specific thing: it allows site admins to specify the values they want for the HTML meta tag that specifies the viewport settings for browsers. It also allows admins to choose the pages in which they want this custom viewport applied.

Back in the day a client required this functionality to embed some browser games that required very specific settings. Nowadays it’s not really common for a site admin to set those values, and developers don’t really require any UI to set them.

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Yeoman Basics by example: A Ctools Content Type generator for Drupal


generator-ctools-content-type example

A few weeks ago I wrote a blog post about Yeoman and the existing Yeoman generators for Drupal. As someone who loves and rants a lot about code generation, it was a tool that I had been wanting to try out for quite some time, and the experience after having spent a couple of hours with the tool, figuring out which generators could be useful for me, was rather satisfactory.

Now, beyond having some generators that I can benefit from, my interest in Yeoman was mostly in the APIish side of it. In other words, I wanted to see how easy it is to create my own generators for whatever tasks I find myself repeating a lot. The best way to find that out is, of course, to try and write a generator plugin for it, facing the usual challenges of being a total newcomer to a language or a framework. One of the most common pieces of code I have to write in my projects, are ctools plugins, in particular, Content Type plugins, so I decided to write a generator for just those type of plugins. This post will explain the basics of the tool and how to create a basic generator. If you want to get the most out of it, I’d recommend you to open your IDE or text editor of choice, and follow along, so that you can experiment with Yeoman at the same time.

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DrupalCamp Spain 2015: Welcome to Jerez

Drupal camp spain 2015 banner

One more year, DrupalCamp Spain is getting closer and closer. This year, it’ll take place in Jerez de la Frontera, and it’ll be during the second half of May (22nd, 23rd and 24th of May, to be precise). Last year’s camp in Valencia was a bit of a miss for me, as I had some troubles with the schedule, and could only attend to a couple of sessions, so I’m more excited this time, given that it’s been a while (2 years, I could say!) since my last DrupalCamp. And it’s always a great pleasure to meet and talk to friend made on previous camps, as well as new people of the Spanish community. Continue reading

Yeoman Generators for Drupal: What’s out there?

drupal logoyeoman-logo

 

I’ve been hearing about Yeoman for quite some time now. Pretty much since the project took off, or soon after. As a tool born in the Javascript community, I came across this little gem when I was learning about Node.js and the different tools and frameworks available for it, either in my free time, or as part of my labs time at my company. Sadly, I didn’t really pay much attention to it. At the end of the day, Node.js was just something I was learning about, but not something I was going to be able to put in place or introduce in projects in the short term. Or, even if it was something I *could* do, it wasn’t in my plans, anyway.

The other reason why I didn’t look into it closer, was that I mistakenly thought it to be a tool only useful for Javascript developers. Some time ago I noticed that Yeoman was getting plenty of attention from other communities too, and in a closer look, I understood that it wasn’t a tool for Node.js, but instead, a tool built on top of Node.js, so I decided to give it a try and see if I could make something useful out of it for Drupal development. Continue reading

Dirty “Probaturas”: An emmet-like parser for php and Drupal

mad scientist doing experiment

“Probatura” (Spanish word): Test, trial, experiment.

If you’re a web developer, chances are that you’ve come across Emmet before. If you haven’t, chances are that you’re wasting time whenever you get to write some html in your favorite code editor or IDE. You should really check it out and see the options on the project page, but let me show you a quick example of how Emmet can help you. Let’s say you’re prototyping a simple page and know the markup you need. It would look like this:

Easy, right? Because you’re a cool front-ender with great and fancy text editors like Sublime or Atom, and fancy features like tag autocompletion, attribute suggestions, etc… surely just a few seconds to write. For you too, phpstorm guy, because nobody beats your all-terrain IDE, capable of even preparing pop-corn for you while you’re churning out the most beautiful PHP lines ever written with, you know… a real programming tool. Not to mention the vim players out there. You really are on another level of the game. HTML ain’t nothing for you, is it? Well, whatever built-in support you have for writing html, Emmet’s going to be better. Continue reading

Adding panels support to the Reply module

One of the major disadvantages of entities in Drupal 7, is the lack of support for built-in comments. This is due to the model of the core comments module, which is heavily tied to nodes -node comments are essentially settings of each content type-, and not available for other entity types. In Drupal 8 this has changed already, and comments are considered fields that can be attached to any entity type.

For Drupal 7, in the meantime, there’s been a similar solution for a while, which is the reply module. The reply module leverages the Entity API to define a “reply” entity type, and offers a UI to create “reply” bundles. Then, via the Field API, you can add a “Reply” field to any entity type, choosing the reply bundle that should be used by that particular field. The flexibility that gives is huge, since it means that you’re not restricted to just a comment type for your application. Continue reading